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is about john brown and the events that changed the course of american history forever. tony is also a pulitzer prizewinning journalist. he worked for many years for the "wall street journal" and "the new york times." but one of the things i want to tell you about tony is he really want to tell you he is a very, very dear friend. one of the things about tony is he really and truly has a notion that we at the journey like to say that we put people in the boots of those who went before us, in order for them to know, as david mccullough told us years ago, those people who lived long ago didn't know they were living long ago. tony one-ups it. because not only do our programs try to put students and visitors and teachers into the boots of those who went long ago, tony, as he writes here, wants to get not into their boots, but into their minds. and he's done that with every book he's written, and it transports us to times and places that really challenge us. so we're here today and we'll have a conversation, and then we're going to open the floor to your questions to this amazing man. beca
>>> tonight, washington remembers chuck brown, the godfather of go go as hundreds celebrate his life and music. >> the worst crash scene some have ever seen. now we know it started when a real cop started two police impersonators. >> details emerging about the death of robert f. kennedy jr.'s estranged wife. first to a man whose name goes hand in hand with washington d.c. chuck brown. he loved the city, changed its music and will forever be remembered for it. >> he died today at age 75 after a battle with pneumonia. a look back on his life. ♪ ♪ ♪ you don't have a thing ♪ >> reporter: charles brown's career spanned 50 years seldom a moment he was not jamming in front of a crowd of bobbing heads and moving feet. the north carolina native got his start in the 60s playing the guitar for a d.c. based latin band. by the 70s. chuck brown was coming into his own. and go go was born. ♪ from the country >> reporter: the godfather of go go its what the world called brown, creator of a musical genre synonymous with d.c. >> they have heard funk before. another form of funky music.
father of the modish d.c -- modern d.c. music scene. chuck brown. he captured the pulse of the street and the beat of the drum. a beat that make a chuck brown show part carnival, part love affair between audience and band. tonight we remember the band leader. >> his passing is a sad moment, but this broadcast will not be a wake. it will be a celebration of a man that gave sows much that despite his absence, will live touched by everyone. >> brown died of multiple organ failure due to sepsis. >> he was treated at johns hopkins hospital in baltimore. he was admitted earlier this month after complaining of arthritis and doctors found blood clots in his legs. the clots were removed but brown came down with pneumonia while hospitalized. we have team coverage as we celebrate the life of one of our area's truly most beloved musicians. >> here is bruce johnson with a lot more on the legacy of chuck brown. >> reporter: we're outside the historic howard theater. chuck brown couldn't be here for the grand opening some weeks ago. he is here tonight in spirit. hundreds if not thousands gather to g
in this essentially very small geographic area. you have brown at the kennedy farm invading harper's ferry in 1859. harper's ferry is a flash point and the civil war changes hands a dozen times. stonewall jackson takes harper's ferry a awe few days before, and that's why the battle happened. the union realizes lee has divided his army. they attack, and as a result of antetum, which is seven miles from the kennedy farm, lincoln issues the emancipation proclamation. so, you know, this incredible journey in our history all occurs in this very tight geographic area. i mean, it really is quite stunning. this is the irony while i was sort of bashing lincoln but suggesting that he wasn't the great emancipator initially that people imagined. he actually was on the conservative end of the anti-slavery spectrum, and this comes through again very much in his attitude towards brown, the great irony is that he eventually comes around to brown's position and that slavery -- this must become a war against slavery and ends up, you know, taking the south that begins to fulfill brown's mission but like brown become
chuck brown, the father of go-go, dead at the age of 75. ahead, a look back at his life and the worldwide reaction to his passing. good morning, everyone, and welcome to "news 4 today." today might be the perfect day. as we take a look sup it goiks to be a delightful day today. enjoy. we had a front come through overnight just with a few clouds. it shifted our wind into the north and that brought in somewhat cooler weather as we got into the 80s. yesterday. it dropped down into the 50s. that's most of the mountain region. shenandoah valley and areas to the west and north of washington. that includes the counties. mid-60s in washington now. all this area in the lighter gre green. it jea it's generally in the 60s. now, hometown forecast for leesburg, loudoun county, night the 50s there now and by noontime should be in the 60s with a few clouds about. peek near 70 by the afternoon thflt time tomorrow morning all the way whack down the 40s. a chilly start to friday. we'll look at your day planner in ten minutes. danella, how's traffic now? >> not looking very nicely at auchl
brown didn't stop until he had to. he had concert dates lined up in the district. when he got sick and ended up in the hospital. tonight, the man behind busting loose and so many distinctive songs has died. we'll start our team coverage with audrey barnes. >> by early afternoon, chuck brown's manager confirm what many feared was coming for weeks. the legendary singer and guitarist was dead. it didn't take long for radio stations to start playing all the hits and for people to take to the streets to remember him. an impromptu vigil at the howard theater swelled to the hundreds. fans and friends of d.c. great, chuck brown, gathered to remember him. radio station, wkys pumped out a stream of his songs. brown was supposed to hold a concert at the howard last month, but had to cancel when he fell ill. >> he just put d.c. on the map. >> on the ♪ [ musical map, that is. he helped launch a new genera in d.c. called go-go. busting loose grew his fan base over time. brown received his first grammy nomination in 2010 for a duo called love. his family is asking for privacy, but not befor
goes there, really joins brown's band to rescue his wife and children. and the tragic part of it is he's the first of brown's band who is -- he's gunned down in the street in harper's ferry. his body is desecrated by angry whites. 50 miles short of his goal of rescuing harriet. and the virginians collected these letters that he had from harriet that appear to have been on his person and published them. that's how we have them. the governor of virginia published all the documents, and they didn't see any indictment of slavery in these letters. they just published them. you just read these letters that are just heart-breaking saying, you know, come save me, dangerfield, because like many virginia slaves of that era, she was scared that she was going to be sold to a gang labor plantation in the deep south, and that's exactly what happened. six months later, she's sold to a plantation in louisiana. so you read these letters, and they're just heart-breaking. but we have them, thanks to the state of virginia. >> you speak about the biracial nature of his band and also his support. he had inf
, "midnight rising" which is about john brown and events that changed the course of american history forever. he worked for many years for "the wall street journal" and "the new york times." he's a swre, very dear friend. one of the things i want to tell you about tony, he really and truly has a notion we like the say that we put people in the boots of those that went before us in order for them to know as david mccullough told us years ago, those people who lived long you a go didn't know they were living long ago. tony one-ups it. not only do our programs try to put students and visitors and teachers into the boots of those long ago, tony wants to get not into their boots but into their minds. and he has done that every book he has written. we are here today. a conversation and then we are going to open the floor to your questions to this amazing man. because you are our friend we can say you are an amazing man. >> they say you can't go home. lived here for 13 years and it still feels like home. there are five people in the audience i still don't know. good to be back. >> we are not very f
brown. >> it is party time. >> kevin has an angel and they are doing go-go in heaven. >> fox amorning news continues right now. right now. south a sad day as washington, d.c. wakes up but we have some nice weather to look forward to today, folks. it is thursday, may 17th, 2012. good morning. i'm sarah simmons. >> i'm will thomas. welcome to fox 5 morning news. all morning, right here, we'll look back on the influence of chuck brown, the godfather of go-go. everybody knows d.c.'s cease side, the monuments, the politic. but chuck brown's beat fueled the heart of the city. he passed with a yesterday at the age of 75. >> hundreds of fans also gathered outside the howard theater last night for an incident prompt use vigil there. he was set to perform there in front of a sold high pressure out crowd next month. this morning, we are sharing some of your femmeries on our facebook page. let's take a look at i few of them. carolyn posted rest in peace, chuck. we will always miss you. -- an impromptu vigil there. this morning, we are sharing some of your memories on our facebook page. >> every
>>> singing that all morning. the music world is remembering the godfather of go-go, chuck brown. i'm sarah simmons i'm will thomas. welcome to fox 5 morning news. certainly very sad to hear about the passing of chuck brown but as we've been saying, his music will live on. all of us still moving in like we always have. >> all right, will, let's see some more moves. >> wait until the next commercial. >> i know it's sad morning but we are starting the day with the weather on a positive note. if you can, are get out and enjoy today. it will be just about perfect around here later. there is your cold front moving through as we speak. south and east of the city now, if you are in southern maryland, lower eastern shore, you have not quite gotten the cooler and drier air. the conditions here should get gradually more and more comfortable throughout the morning. currently, we are still a little warm. 69 at reagan national. 66 at dulles. bwi marshall, 67 degrees. here is your forecast for today. just a perfect afternoon. lots of sunshine. low humidity, 75 your daytime high in washington and
for you from the country to the inner city ♪ >>> chuck brown passed way yesterday after a short bout with pneumonia at age 75. he was the founder of go-go, a sound that came to define the district. >> this morning the city that loved him so much is showed their love for him. dancing out in the streets in north washington last night and tracee wilkins is live outside that theater this morning. good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning. chuck brown created this music in the '70s and has been playing it all of this time. i can tell you i have never seen the actual end of a chuck brown concert because i get tired have and go home. he would keep playing with all of this energy and enthusiasm like he was still 20 30r years old. in his 70s would play for hours and hours. i mean nonstop. no intermission. no breaks. this was music about the people of d.c. and the people of d.c. were in it and helped to create it. it's fitting that would want to come here and pay tribute to him. let me show you what it looked like last night. as you said, thousands of people dancing in the streets. his da
. nk you. >> that is a d.c. legend. music lovers all over the world are remembering chuck brown this morning. the pioneer of go-go passed away from multiple organ failure after suffering from knew mope i can't. he was the creative force behind go-go. >> shawn yancy takes a look back at his amazing career and life. life. >> reporter: for five decades, chuck brown gave his fans his all keeping them on his feet with heart-thumping go-go beats, a genre of music that he created. >> at first, they had go-go clubs, dancers, no music. i decided to call it go-go music. >> reporter: in 2010, chuck earned his first ever grammy nomination. >> it is the greatest thing. oh, my god. >> reporter: how did it make you feel? >> i haven't gotten over it yet. i ain't never going to get over it, okay? >> reporter: chuck started sing gospel when he was just a little boy. he spent his youth in and out of jails. lorton penitentiary in northern virginia is the place that gave hive to his musical career. >> after i did about three of those shows, i knew i was going to be something. when i got out of there
for their trips. >>> the tributes continue to pour in for the late chuck brown. coming up, we talk to the men who helped d.c. music legend, go-go. but first, a second grader in colorado tries to honor an african american icon, but instead, gets a hard lesson in race relations. we'll talk about this one. stay with us. >>> all in state students at virginia tech will see their tuition go up next year. the university board of visitors approved a 3.9% hike for tuition and fees and that means students will have to shell out close to $11,000 a year to go to virginia tech. that increase, governor bob mcdonald had requested, he wanted state schools to keep state tuition under 8%. >>> a project sparked racism. the kid's name is shawn king and he had been assigned to dress up like martin luther king, so as you might see there, the second grader put on a black suit and a fake mustache and some dark face paint. members of the faculty and students complained about it. the principal told shawn to wash his face. the 8-year-old said no. he was sent home. >> i worked very hard. i tried my best. i don't want to be
tribute to chuck brown. the d.c. music legend died yesterday. he was 75 years ode. chuck brown was born in north carolina but he made his name on the d.c. music scene in the '70s. literally made his name over because he went to jail as one thing and said never going back to jail. i'm going to be chuck brown and never went back to jail as that name. in 2009 part of 7th street near t street northwest was renamed chuck brown way. he played live concerts up until last year. he was even honored by the national symphony orchestra last september. >> when anybody you meet talks about chuck brown they instantly smile. you'll notice that. a crowd gathered outside the howard theater last night for an impromptu vigil last night to honor chuck brown and it wasn't a sad event. it was a celebration of his music and a lot of people were dancing. chuck brown called his music go- go because it just kept going. he created the continuous beat to stock the dance floors at the clubs from clearing out. >> delia goncalves is live at the studios in maryland with more on the legacy. good morning. >> reporter: g
'm originally from washington, d.c., and ian just don't know life without chuck brown. certainly, he was able toab captivate audiences all the time, shows back to back to back, coming to multiple shows,t and heip was able to put go-go into a national arena and where people around the world know go-go music.c. >> what does this mean to you? personally?pe >> my heart is heavy and i feel sad because it's a staple of my growing up, and it's justs vetches, something that reminds me so much of home, i now reside in philadelphia, and i miss homm and wish i could be there with the folks today to celebrate him, and just being able to work with him once in my life is huge, and certainly just myus heart is heavy, but i know in aw the legacy he left will live on, especially through me and others like myself. >> thank you very much.er we appreciate you joining us. >> here is a rare clip of the a duo with marion barry. >> councilman barry joins us live at fox 5 studios. we just heard aja touch on it. how much of a role do you think he has played in the identity of this city?y? >> i've known chuck brown ove
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: syrians shouted in anger and relief, anxious to tell their stories of the weekend's horrific massacre to u.n. observers and a television team. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we go inside the town of houla with alex thomson of "independent television news," the first journalist to report from there. >> brown: then, we turn to the 2012 presidential match-up on track to be the most expensive contest ever. >> woodruff: we examine the internet virus knownwns s he flame" that may y a ae to snsnch data and eaveveroroon computer users. >> brown: in the first of two reports, paul solman assesses the true cost of student-loan debt, now topping $1 trillion. >> reporter: beth hansen has just started making loan payments: $468 a month. will she ever pay off her loans? >> i may die first. so. in which case, they would need a copy of my death certificate to finally cancel my loan. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks with dolores huerta, honored with the presidential medal of
-go. singer, song writer, and guitarist, chuck brown, helped define d.c.'s music scene with this funky beat. tonight, fox 5 is remembering chuck brown. the godfather may be gone, but his music and influence lives on. >>> thank you for joining us, i'm shawn yancy. >> and i'm brian bolter. chuck brown died at the age of 75 today. he was at john hopkins battling pneumonia. >> fox 5's audrey barnes begins our coverage. audrey. >> reporter: chuck brown was perhaps best known as the gadfather of go-go, but he was an incredible family man. he scheduled his concert appearances around his son's football games and he passed his music to his other son. he left his mark on d.c. as well. >> talk about going to ben's chili bowl. you talk about the lincoln theater, the howard theater, and you talk about chuck. because they are all institutions. >> love grown up loving chuck brown. he sang at her high school prom and to this day, she still moves by his music. >> i know all those chuck brown songs and when i hear one, i will get out of my car and dance in the street if i have to. chuck brown could no
. >> reporter: we're outside the historic howard theater, chuck brown couldn't be here for the grand opening some weeks ago. he's here tonight in spirit. and as hundreds if not thousands of people gather to give chuck a d.c. sendoff. >> we lost a great one so we got to celebrate his life and his legacy. >> i love chuck brown. i've been listening to him all my life every school dance. ♪ >> reporter: d.c. mayor gray says he may open the washington convention center for chuck brown's funeral. >> chuck was a great human being. and frankly a good friend of mine. >> reporter: tributes were pouring in from the high and mighty to the low for the father of go go. >> he flew off the covers and made people understand we are a lot more than a government town. >> probably tell the city to party hard for him tonight. he really would tell the city to party hard. this is a devastating loss. >> reporter: got a gramny mom nation? >> oh my god. unbelievable. ♪ >> reporter: chuck brown was 75. he began performing back in the 1960s. by the '70s when the rest of the country was deep into disco, d.c. had the o
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: europe faced a potential new direction today after voters in france and greece rejected harsh austerity measures. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the weekend's elections, and what's at stake across the continent. >> brown: then we turn to the presidential contest here in the u.s., as vice president biden stirs new questions over the politics of same-sex marriage. >> ifill: spencer michaels reports on a trendy gourmet treat of the crunchy, crawly variety. >> these are huge. they're usually super abundant and very good to eat. i can put it in barbecue. >> brown: and margaret warner examines the trial of five 9-11 suspects arraigned in a military courtroom on saturday. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the at&t network-- a living, breathing intelligence bringing people together to bring new ideas to life. >> look, it's so simple. >> in a year, the bright minds from inside and o
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: non-white births now account for a majority of newborns in america, that according to new census numbers released today. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, we assess the data and the impact on society, the economy, immigration policy and life in the u.s. >> brown: then, we have a newsmaker interview with treasury secretary timothy geithner on jobs, j.p. morgan's spectacular losses, and once again, a looming debt crisis. >> we're fighting wars, we've got a major financial crisis in europe. we have all these challenges. political politicians threatening to default if we don't adopt a partisan agenda. irresponsible. >> warner: ray suarez has the next in our daily download series. tonight, how the presidential campaigns use youtube as a cheap and effective way to get eyeballs on campaign videos. >> brown: from thailand, fred de sam lazaro reports on one man's efforts to combat hardships and instill a new way of thinking in rural regions of the southeast as
. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we assess what's behind the downward trend, and whether it's likely to continue into the summer travel season. >> woodruff: then, we update the battle for the presidency in egypt as a muslim brotherhood candidate wins a spot in the runoff elections next month. >> brown: ray suarez examines the lasting legacy of the case of the missing child etan patz. >> woodruff: miles o'brien reports on safety measures at u.s. nuclear plants, and asks are they ready for a worst-case scenario, a fukushima-like meltdown? >> the i anybodya against change and against improvement, i think it's something we have to be vigilant about and push so the regulator can make sure that change happens. >> david >> brown: david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and we talk to pulitzer prize winning author stephen greenblatt about his new book, the story of the rediscovery of an ancient manuscript and its influence even today. >> one day, it is on the shelf and not instantly but decisively the world changes. >> woodruff: that's all
.1% in april, but job growth was down a little from march. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we analyze the new numbers, and assess the prospects of work for college graduates and other young people entering the job market. >> woodruff: then, ray suarez examines the apparent easing of the diplomatic crisis between beijing and washington over a blind activist, as chinese officials said today he can apply to study abroad. >> brown: margaret warner talks with author peter bergen about his new book "manhunt," a look at the long pursuit and final days of osama bin laden. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close tonight with a look at a national effort to engage young people at the local level through the music of marvin gaye and their own artistic expressions. >> brown: and we close we're like a broken down city. it's not just the economy that is causing cleveland the problem right now. it's the attitude; it's the struggle. we need to make a change. that's what i am expecting people to hear
act that? >> i think gordon brown was in master spend more than alistair and tony blair. i think the whole of new labor engaged in a new way with the media when they came to power. >> what steps did you take to counteract that? think in the journalistic story or a line from a politician and repeats it verbatim without checking it or analyzing it. it will of a journalist is not to just gather information but to analyze and process that information. >> but hubert on his side, he made that clear -- but you were on his side. you made that clear a few minutes ago? >> when you back a political party in the way some did in 1997, i was not there then but i was a close observer. i do not think you back them wholeheartedly. i think if you look at the "sun "from 1997 until when tony blair left, you would be quite confused if it was supporting the party particularly on europe. but other issues as well. >> you speak to it in your statement. you were on mr. blair's side, were you? >> you are talking about the hostilities between gordon brown and tony blair? >> you were talking about in your st
from a bridge. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, we go inside the courtroom at today's sentencing and explore the issues in a case that captured national attention. >> ifill: then, we examine a lawsuit filed by catholic leaders, institutions and schools against the obama administration for mandating birth control coverage for employees. >> brown: from our american graduate series, paul solman reports on a move to keep kids in school by teaching skills both inside and outside the classroom. >> high school dropouts here in bloomington, illinois building low income houses like those very homes behind me. is this the way to get kids back to school and into the work force? >> ifill: judy woodruff assesses the nato summit, as world leaders agree to hand over security in afghanistan by the middle of next year. >> brown: and we remember powerful german baritone dietrich fischer-dieskau. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the at&t network-- a living, breath
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 829 (some duplicates have been removed)